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The Fashion Law - "Why Is Fashion So Obsessed with Making the Mundane Luxury Right Now?"

Recently, The Fashion Law tweeted out the above, which at first glance I brushed off as another clickbait article and a smirk-inducing pair of pasta earrings (Dolce and Gabbana clip earrings). But in the constant refresh/scroll-from-top pattern that we are all too familiar with in the days of news-inundation I realized I actually LOVE these earrings. It wasn’t just the hilarity of wearing two pieces of pasta in my ears, the religious iconography (I have long since broken from the Catholic Church), or the irony of the thought of pairing the two together. It was the fact that this single image of earrings was able to instantly transport me back to my days in Piazza della Santissima Annunziata, steps away from my Florence apartment where I would spend Sunday perusing the farmers market. Because of these earrings, I could almost feel the Tuscan sun on my skin as I pick up bags of homemade pasta while the church bells ring in the background. Because of an image of earrings, a smorgasbord of warm memories of the Italian Sunday dinners of my childhood were evoked. Because of this image on a scroll through my twitter feed, warm memories became so tangible they momentarily broke my NYC winter depression. I would argue that is quite anything but mundane.

High fashion, like high art, has a long history of raising its perfectly groomed eyebrows at things it considers lower than thou.

High fashion, like high art, has a long history of raising its perfectly groomed eyebrows at things it considers lower than thou. It seems to me that the word “mundane” may be being used here to hide the high horse we sit upon. Once I clicked on the link I was sent to an article that among other things, discusses D&G’s partnership with the pasta brand Pastificio di Martino. The partnership produced a limited run of 5,000 boxes of pasta in designer tins that sold for $110. W went on to explain that designers seem to have no problem finding buyers to be in on their jokes, even if said buyer doesn’t fully understand the punch line.

But, what if there isn’t a punch line because it was never a joke? What if D&G set out to make a statement celebration of a culture they obviously take very seriously (sometimes to a fault)? Because to me, that is exactly what it feels like. I may never be willing to spend $110 on a box of pasta, and I may never be able to afford the $294 earrings, but that doesn’t mean I don’t see the value in both.

So maybe instead of starting to throw condescending words around we should just continue walking by when it’s not for us?

This argument is easy for me to make because these items feel very close to me; complete art pieces that reflect more of myself than I allow when I look in the mirror. And the truth is, this is probably the case for many people when they look at other pieces of fashion or types of art. People with different cultures, experiences, and lives than me. People will see life, love, and celebration in items I may pass in the store windows without blinking at. So maybe instead of starting to throw condescending words around we should just continue walking by when it’s not for us?

PS – If you are like me and love the pasta earrings but can’t afford the D&G lifestyle, here is a DIY lifehack for you.