When scrolling through runway archives I often stop on a design and think how much it looks like a piece I just saw in a museum (see Dior runway 2004 and Lynda Bengalis sculptures). So I thought I would try this process for myself. In attempt to blur the line between art and fashion completely, here are how I envision some of my favorite artists as designers:

— Katrina Orsini

Fashion Illustrations by Katrina Orsini

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Cy Twomblymore_vert

Cy Twomblycloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Fifty Days at Iliam. Shades of Achilles, Patroclus, and Hector

Date: 1978

Style: Neo-Expressionism

Series: Fifty Days at Iliam

Genre: abstract

Image via wikiart.org

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Edgar Arceneauxmore_vert

Edgar Arceneauxcloseremove

Exemplary Work

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My Father Jim

2010

Sugar crystals, books, chicken wire, card board, wood, string and glass., 60

Image cia vielmetter.com

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Chakaia Bookermore_vert

Chakaia Bookercloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Sugar in my Bowl, 2003

rubber tire and steel

95 x 110 x 57 3/4 inches

Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Gallery, New York

Image via kemperart.org

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Petah Coynemore_vert

Petah Coynecloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Untitled #781

1994

Wax, plastic, cloth, and steel

Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore, in honor of the artist

© Petah Coyne, Courtesy of Galerie Lelong, New York

Image via nmwa.org

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Ludovica Giosciamore_vert

Ludovica Giosciacloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Rococo Hardcore (detail)

2007

Photography by Ståle Eriksen.

Image via www.ludovicagioscia.com

More about Ludovica Gioscia

Website - www.ludovicagioscia.co

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El Anatsuimore_vert

El Anatsuicloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Photo by Katrina Orsini

More about El Anatsui

Website - el-anatsui.com

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Lee Bontecoumore_vert

Lee Bontecoucloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Untitled

1960

steel, canvas, copper wire

Photo by Katrina Orsini

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Georgia O'Keeffemore_vert

Georgia O'Keeffecloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Music Pink and Blue

Date: 1918

Style: Abstract Art, Precisionism

Series: Music Pink and Blue

Genre: abstract

Public domain image via wikiart.org

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Eva Hessemore_vert

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Exemplary Work

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1969–70

latex, rope, string, and wire

at the Whitney Museum

Photo by Benjamin Sutton via hyperallergic.com

More about Eva Hesse

Interview - Finally, a Documentary About Eva Hesse’s Life and Work

Guggenheim - www.guggenheim.org

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Louise Bourgeoismore_vert

Louise Bourgeoiscloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Spider

1997

bronze with brown patina

238,7 x 243,8 x 213,3 cm

Image via art-sheep.com

More about Louise Bourgeois

moma.org

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Liz Millermore_vert

Liz Millercloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Untitled 12 (Mimetic Deception)

2012

Mixed media on paper

24.5 x 19.5 x 8 in. (62.2 x 49.5 x 20.3 cm), framed

Image via davidbsmithgallery.com

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John Chamberlainmore_vert

John Chamberlaincloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Scull's Angel

1974

American, 1927

Welded painted steel

29 x 45 x 38 inches

"John Chamberlain's use of auto parts as a material suitable for sculpture, and his use of compression as a technique, came to define the signature elements of the artist's work beginning in the late 1950s. In Scull's Angel, what at first appears as an explosion of violent, uncontained energy is in fact a unitary field of tightly knit, baroque folds of steel. The title of the piece combines a reference to the New York taxi and limousine baron Robert Scull, a prominent collector of Pop art and sometime drinking companion of the artist, whose taxicab fleet was called "Scull's Angels." The term "angel" is occasionally used to designate a patron of the arts. The fact that Scull's Angel appears to be made of parts of a smashed and deformed taxi fender may be an ironic comment on Chamberlain's "twisted" relationship to the collector. The artist's approach to sculptural form has been substantially informed by his appreciation of the found and manipulated objects welded together by the sculptor David Smith, and also by the Abstract Expressionist paintings of Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning. Yet the artist's use of the automobile—perhaps America's most prominent cultural icon—relates directly to the consumer imagery of Pop art. Citing influences from both Abstract Expressionism and Pop art, Scull's Angel reflects a conscious synthesis of these two critical American art movements."

Image and information via The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

More about John Chamberlain

Website - www.johnchamberlain.co

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Judy Pfaffmore_vert

Judy Pfaffcloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Rangoli

2012

Pigmented expanded foam, melted plastic

16 x 14 x 17.5 inches

Image via judypfaffstudio.com

More about Judy Pfaff

Website - judypfaffstudio.com

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Aili Schmeltzmore_vert

Aili Schmeltzcloseremove

Exemplary Work

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Fire Mountain (detail)

2008

nails, string, and wood

variable dimension installation

Image via ailischmeltz.com

More about Aili Schmeltz

Website - www.ailischmeltz.com

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